The New York Yacht Club, 1899-1901
Whitney Warren and Charles Wetmore, Architects

Model Room, including limestone fireplace and half-hull models along walls

Model Room, including limestone fireplace and half-hull models along walls
text and photograph © 19990902-A Walter Dufresne

Limestone Fireplace in Model Room

Limestone Fireplace in Model Room
text and photograph © 19990902-B Walter Dufresne

Tap Room, Adjacent the Dining Room

Tap Room, Adjacent the Dining Room
text and photograph © 19990918-A Walter Dufresne

Trophy Room (site of the America's Cup during most of the 20th Century)

Trophy Room (site of the America's Cup during most of the 20th Century)
text and photograph © 19990918-B Walter Dufresne

Entry Way to Model Room

Entry Way to Model Room
text and photograph © 19990918-D Walter Dufresne

Dining Room, looking towards West 44th Street

Dining Room, looking towards West 44th Street
text and photograph © 19991003-A Walter Dufresne

Main Entry Stair, looking northeast from second floor balcony of Model Room

Main Entry Stair, looking northeast from second floor balcony of Model Room
text and photograph © 19911015-H Walter Dufresne

Stained Glass in ceiling of Model Room

Stained Glass in ceiling of Model Room
text and photograph © 19911015-A Walter Dufresne

Working with the assistant and graphic designer Fernando Martinez, I styled, propped, lit, and created the photographs here while studying 19th-Century U. S. architectural history — both high-style and vernacular — in Dr. Kevin Murphy's class nearby at the Graduate School of the City University of New York.  Created by the architects Whitney Warren and Charles Wetmore at the very end of the 19th Century, the Club is, of course, utterly distinct from any modest rowhouse along Brooklyn's Gowanus Canal built a few years earlier.  A certain Carroll Street rowhouse will be the subject of a future linked web page and, I hope, the start of a series of web pages about New York City inspired by the example of the writer Christopher S. Gray.

Assembled and edited and updated 2006/01/16 by , Brooklyn, New York, from photographs copyrighted and registered 1999.  This page, including texts and photographs, is hereby released only for all uses and reproductions that are *both* private and non-commercial.  Scholarly uses, including linking and re-publication and classroom exhibitions and lecture presentations, will be freely licensed only with prior written permission from Walter Dufresne, who is the owner of the registered copyrights to these photographs.  All other uses, including editorial and other public uses, are expressly prohibited without permission in the form of a written license from Walter Dufresne.  These photographs, including certain camera-original films, are scheduled for future transmission into the Historic American Buildings Survey of the United State Library of Congress, at which time copyright will be dissolved into the public domain and the photographs will no longer be subject to copyright. Until then — and as per Title 17 of the United States Code — these photographs are copyrighted.

"If you have to ask how much it costs, you can't afford it." Commodore J. Pierpont Morgan (1837-1913)